Forthcoming titles

Recent Lectures and Upcoming Projects

It has been a busy yet productive fall, winter, and spring, and new BELL WITCH-related lectures, books, and other items are on this year’s horizon! More on that in the coming weeks. This is, of course, in addition to several other projects I am currently working on.

I will also be talking more about the Bell Witch development I posted recently, regarding an old, 1856 reprinted account of the BELL WITCH that recently surfaced, and its impact on a theory recently popularized by the skeptical community.

Meanwhile, I am leaving you with photos from two BELL WITCH lectures and storytelling sessions I did last fall–one in Sparta, Tennessee, and another at the McCracken County Public Library in Paducah, Kentucky. Enjoy.

Talk to you soon!

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Book Excerpt: “From Turkey Creek – A Memoir”

As many already know, From Turkey Creek – A Memoir is a long-term work in progress. It is my childhood memoir of growing up at the most remote, fun, and wacky place in the world: Turkey Creek, in Humphreys County, Tennessee. This is a short, transitional chapter I wrote, which describes the “general stores” that dotted the countryside near Turkey Creek back in the day.

 

ON COUNTRY STORES

Nearly every dirt road out in the country had a general store. Within an eight-mile radius of Turkey Creek, there was Nolan Sulley Grocery, Thomas Freeland Grocery, George Harris Grocery, Leonard Barnes Grocery, Clyde Rose Grocery, Harold Smith Grocery, Dudley Jones Grocery, and William Covington Grocery. Usually named for their retiree owners, these rural mom-and-pop institutions were the places where good country folk met, talked politics, and engaged in long, serious talks about the lack or overabundance of rain. Women bought what they needed and left; the men stayed and gossiped.

(more…)

The Death of Sarah (An excerpt)

Below is a short paragraph excerpt from my forthcoming sequel to Ghostly Cries From Dixie. The excerpt comes from a chapter dealing with Tennessee’s infamous “Thomas House,” one of America’s most haunted places. Scheduled for release in the fall, the “Ghostly Cries” sequel follows in the terrifying footsteps of its predecessor by serving up a bewitching concoction of weird and ghostly tales from the American South.

The Death of Sarah

In the summer of 1929, eight-year-old Sarah Hanning and her parents visited the Cloyd Hotel and Spa in hopes of curing her rare stomach condition. Her doctor believed that bathing in the water from nearby springs would help her. She tried to stay active and cheerful throughout her stay at the resort, but her stomach ailment often brought intense pain and weakness.

Sarah’s daily trips to the spring did more harm than good; in just two weeks, the color had faded from her skin and a yellow puffiness had begun to fill her eyes. Her health deteriorated rapidly, and it wasn’t long before she couldn’t muster enough energy to get out of bed. One sultry July morning, Sarah began shaking violently and vomiting profusely. Over the next few minutes, she rolled around in her bed and covered her mouth with her hands to try to stop the vomiting, but to no avail. When the violent spell finally subsided, she developed severe chills and passed out. She lay motionless in her mother’s arms while her father and Mr. Cloyd went to fetch the local doctor. By the time they returned, Sarah was dead.

End

If you haven’t already snagged a copy of the first book, Ghostly Cries From Dixie, you can get eBook and paperback copies by clicking here and following the Amazon links. If you prefer a signed and personalized copy, click here. To keep tabs on all of my writing forays and initiatives, click here to join my official Facebook page.

Stuckey’s Bridge Update

GREAT NEWS!  The release date for The Legend of Stuckey’s Bridge has been moved up. It will be available on Amazon in both paperback and Kindle around June 21st.  Barnes & Noble, Nook, Sony, Kobo, and iBooks, will follow shortly thereafter. The video trailer premieres next week.


The Legend of Stuckey’s Bridge
by Lori Crane, Foreword by Pat Fitzhugh
Psychosis knows no bounds

Facebook Page for New Bell Witch Title

I’ve received several private messages with questions about the rewrite/13th Anniversary edition of “The Bell Witch: The Full Account.”  That’s great!  I intend to publish a FAQ about the rewrite in the coming days.

The “Rewrite FAQ,” as well as progress reports and excerpts, will be posted to the book’s existing Facebook page.  The new edition will not have a dedicated page; it will use the existing Bell Witch page.

For those with questions about the new book, or who would like progress reports and excerpts, please make sure to add the following page to your Facebook “Likes.”  Thanks!

The Bell Witch on Facebook

Progress Report on Forthcoming “Bell Witch” Title

I’ve been busy typing away on the update and complete rewrite of The Bell Witch: The Full Account, scheduled for release on October 13, 2013. The book’s first edition debuted on Friday, October 13, 2000. Yes, Friday the thirteenth of October, in the year 2000.

The 2013 update, which is a full rewrite available in both paperback and eBook formats, coincides with the book’s thirteenth anniversary. There’s just something about that number–thirteen.

Two weeks have elapsed since I [finally] located the book’s original file–created in Word 97–and opened it for the first time in thirteen years. I could’ve sworn my computer’s screen turned yellow and began to smell musty, it has been that long. Here is what I’ve done over the past two weeks:

  • Reduced the page count from 406 to 348!
  • Removed three entire sections (not reflected in revised page count).
  • Added 24 new pieces of new information about the case.

The copy and developmental editing will continue over the summer. New covers, both front and back, will also be added. The promotional campaign will begin in May. Also this year, I have two more books to finish and a busy lecture/signing schedule. Please send prayers and coffee.

The Bell Witch – Major Rewrite, eBook in 2013

To celebrate the book’s thirteenth anniversary, The Bell Witch: The Full Account will be offered as an eBook for the Kindle, Nook, and iReader, beginning October 13th. But that’s not all.

In addition to being offered as an eBook, the thirteenth anniversary edition will feature a major update–developments over the past 13 years–and a full rewrite of the original text. When asked about his reason for rewriting the book, author Pat Fitzhugh stated, “I am loyal to my readers, and I want to give them my best–my very best. My writing has developed and improved over the past thirteen years, and I want my readers to enjoy those improvements. Also, a rewrite allows me to flow the book into a newer, more prolific genre.”

The Bell Witch: The Full Account, which reveals many previously unknown facts surrounding the infamous case, raised the bar for Bell Witch research and caused two previously published Bell Witch books to be rewritten after its publication. And, nearly every Bell Witch book, video, and article produced since “The Full Account” has drawn extensively from its research notes and appendices, sans attribution. Over its life, “The Full Account” has attracted two motion picture options and has twice appeared on the State of Tennessee’s Suggested Teen Summer Reading List.

“Several theories have been put forth in recent years, and they need addressing,” says author Pat Fitzhugh. “I’ve also learned more about the real people involved with the legend, especially one individual,” Fitzhugh notes. “Their keen observations were hastily dismissed nearly 200 years ago, but when those observations are added to what we’ve learned over the past couple decades, we unmistakably identify a culprit with a genuine, provable motive; closure is likely on the horizon.”

The Bell Witch rewrite and eBook conversion will be Fitzhugh’s main focus over the coming months. The sequel to Ghostly Cries From Dixie is still planned, but its release could fall in early 2014. From Turkey Creek – A Memoir, Fitzhugh’s childhood memoir, is now in final edit and should released in time for the holidays.

To keep up with the Bell Witch eBook project’s progress and other news pertaining to The Bell Witch: The Full Account, please join the book’s official fan page on Facebook.

#WIP #indiepub #storytelling #AmWriting #paranormal “Ghostly Cries” Sequel Coming Soon

The sequel to Ghostly Cries From Dixie is well underway. The first three drafts are edited, and the fourth is almost complete. Only two more drafts to go! The sequel, with a working title of MORE Ghostly Cries From Dixie, will feature more weird and ghostly tales–and haunted locations–from the land of moonshine and magnolias. The release date has not been set, but both the paperback and Kindle editions will be on shelves in time for Halloween 2013!

Speaking of Ghostly Cries From Dixie… if you haven’t read the first book yet, now would be a great time to snag a copy. The Kindle edition is now on sale for only $2.99!

Click here to purchase and download your copy instantly!  Pleasant dreams.

Pat Fitzhugh's "Ghostly Cries From Dixie" -- Front cover.

“Ghostly Cries From Dixie” — Front cover.

An Excerpt From my Forthcoming Book #mustread #Book #amwriting

From Turkey Creek – A Memoir

Pat Fitzhugh

The Armand Press (2013 )

“Often hysterically funny, sometimes wrenching, Fitzhugh’s straight-shooting memoir is laced with fine storytelling, sharp wit, and acute observations of life in rural Tennessee. He remembers vividly what it felt like to be a kid: the pleasure of being outdoors; the unquestioned bonds of a friendship; and the oddness of many of the things adults do.”

–Pre-publication Review, 2012

 

From Turkey Creek – A Memoir is scheduled for release in late 2013.  Below is the book’s introductory chapter:

I N T R O D U C T I O N

If you look at a map of Tennessee, there is, on Kentucky Lake’s east bank, north of Waverly and east of Big Sandy, a little bay called Turkey Creek. Don’t fret if you can’t find it; even some locals have trouble finding the place. Look for the little cove with a tiny island at its mouth. That’s Turkey Creek.

Originating in the hills of northwest Humphreys County, Turkey Creek snakes through eight miles of hickory forests, manure-laden pastures, and lowland thickets before widening and emptying into Kentucky Lake. At its mouth, Turkey Creek is nearly a half-mile wide.

The name “Turkey Creek” describes not only a rolling stream of minnows, crayfish, and cow poop, but also the countryside through which it flows—and any location within, say, eight miles of the creek. When someone says, “I live at Turkey Creek,” they could live anywhere in northwestern Humphreys County. People describe area roads in much the same way. Most are simply called, “Turkey Creek Road.”  It’s easier that way.

Up until the last decade, when a modern marina and scores of new cabins sprang up, Turkey Creek rarely changed. In 1950, a lonely dirt road led past a campground and a fishing resort, then around a sharp curve at the creek’s mouth, and to a handful of cabins fronting Kentucky Lake. In 1960, the same dirt road led past the same campground and fishing resort, around the same sharp curve, and to the same lakefront cabins, and in 1970, and 1980, and so on. The number of cabins near the lake remained constant for many years, but the structures changed often; old cabins fell down and new cabins took their places. What was constant was always changing.

I grew up in two of those cabins. Turkey Creek is where I shot my first fish, snagged my first possum, spewed my first obscenity, kissed my first girl, and savagely attacked a family of tame ducks. Along the way, I learned the difference between a largemouth bass and a buglemouth bass, a water snake and a water moccasin, a pint of whiskey and a pint of moonshine, deer hunting and dear hunting, and a knot and a concussion. This was from the late-1960s until 1980.

During that period, Turkey Creek was more than simply a place for wild-eyed young boys to grow up. Turkey Creek was a place where friendships were forged, enemies were forgiven, lessons were learned, and where amazing things unfolded just beneath the surface of everyday life. Turkey Creek will always be special to me; it was my life’s starting point and the source of my fondest memories.

There has never been an official source of information about Turkey Creek during that period, perhaps because so few people are left to tell about it; some have moved away, others have moved on. Moreover, no sane person would want to read about Turkey Creek, much less write about it. Until now.

The book that follows is the true story of a young boy growing up at Turkey Creek, written by that same boy, years later. It is a memoir, a sigh of gratitude, a way of returning.”  ♦

Turkey Creek – Defined (Really)

Turkey Creek is where a turtle can cross the road and not be asked about its intentions.

I received an e-mail from a reporter, asking me to summarize Turkey Creek–the setting for my upcoming memoir–in just one sentence. I wish all requests were that easy.

From Turkey Creek – A Memoir is scheduled for mid-year release. Look for it. In the meantime, you can learn more about Turkey Creek and the insane book about growing up there, on the book’s Facebook page.

#amwriting